Attuned Interactions: Issue 5, May 2018

Editorial

Here is the fifth issue of Attuned Interactions. There is the customary wide range of descriptions of Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) and Video Enhanced Reflective Practice (VERP) practice from the field, and from a variety of agencies, which is what makes the ejournal so eagerly anticipated by its readers. As promised in the last editorial, we have an interesting article from our affiliated Italian organisation ‘Active Change’. Written by Francesca Oliva, it describes VIG as a way to improve well-being and relationships in a home for elderly people. Anne-Marie Walker gives us a case study on using Video Interaction Guidance directly with children and young people. Bushell, Cooper and Davies describe introducing the use of Video Interaction Guidance in Gloucestershire, through the experiences of educational psychologists and specialist health visitors. Pitt and Soni describe using Video Enhanced Reflective Practice (VERP) for a Trainee Educational Psychologist (TEP) seeking to improve their work with parents. Finally we are reprinting an article from Educational Psychology in Scotland by Cruikshank, Findlay and Quinn on improving young people’s health and wellbeing by developing their resilience through the use of targeted evidence based interventions, professional development opportunities and teacher coaching and mentoring (i.e. Video Enhanced Reflective Practice). Sadly we have to hold over to the next issue a fascinating article by Marie Larvin on the benefits of creating a VIG workforce that reflects its multi-ethnic community in a London borough.

This is the last issue of Attuned Interactions that I shall be editing.  Attuned Interactions is currently affiliated to several international organisations associated with VIG, including the Association of Video Interaction Guidance UK (AVIGuk), but it remains entirely independent. I feel proud that my vision of having an independent ‘practice journal’ for the VIG and VERP community, which is online and accessible to all, has proven a success. This is due wholly to the authors who write so generously about their experiences and to the external readers who assist and support the authors to make their articles as good as they can be. It is inspiring to see the enthusiasm for VIG that trainees and clients, guiders and supervisors, show in their everyday lives. For several reasons, I now feel it is time to hand the production of the ejournal on to the next generation of editors. A small editorial group is being formed, of whom the first confirmed name is Dr Stephanie Satariano.

Stephanie is a chartered Educational and Child Psychologist. She is an AVIGuk accredited V.I.G./VERP practitioner and Supervisor. She has a strong interest in using VIG/VERP throughout her work, with families and in schools, to promote positive and attuned communication styles. She has presented on VIG at conferences and is carrying out research in video feedback interventions. She forms part of the research group of the AVIGuk board, and has been an active and enthusiastic supporter of Attuned Interactions from the start. Please contact Stephanie@childpsychology.london with proposals for articles for Issue 6 and with offers to join the group of external readers.

Happy reading!  and best wishes, Mim

Miriam Landor
Educational Psychologist, HCPC-registered, CPsychol, AFBPsS, RAPPS.
National Supervisor and Trainer for ‘Video Interaction GuidanceTM (AVIGuk)

www.vigorkney.co.uk

www.videointeractionguidance.net

attunedinteractions.wordpress.com

http://www.jkp.com/uk/video-interaction-guidance.html

http://www.jkp.com/uk/video-enhanced-reflective-practice.html

www.facebook.com/vigorkney

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Attuned Interactions is the e-journal for the international Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) community.

Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is a video feedback intervention that enhances communication within relationships.  It does this by using video clips of ‘better than usual’ interactions in authentic situations to actively engage clients in change.  Clients are supported to reflect on the video clips in the light of their own hopes of a better future in their relationships with people who are important to them.

Our aims for this e-journal are to promote the benefits of VIG, to develop and communicate the evidence base for VIG and to offer an opportunity to debate issues facing VIG practitioners and clients.

We publish articles in English on VIG, and on other related strengths-based video feedback interventions. These articles range from academic to practice-based, and their authors from expert to novice, from VIG supervisor, guider or trainee to VIG participants and their communities.

Copyright remains with the authors; please contact them with any queries. The views expressed are those of the authors, and not of the members of the editorial group.

All articles are sent to several members of a panel of peer readers for comments, which guide the authors’ amendments before publishing.

CONTENTS

Introducing the use of Video Interaction Guidance in Gloucestershire: Experiences of Educational Psychologists and specialist Health Visitors. Bushell,  Cooper and Davies

To improve young people’s health and wellbeing by developing their resilience through the use of targeted evidence based interventions, professional development opportunities and teacher coaching and mentoring (i.e. Video Enhanced Reflective Practice). Published in Educational Psychology in Scotland Vol.18 No.1 Winter 2017. Cruikshank, Findlay and Quinn

VIG as a Way to Improve Well-Being and Relationships in a Home for Elderly People. Oliva

Video Enhanced Reflective Practice (VERP) for a Trainee Educational Psychologist (TEP) Seeking to Improve their Work with Parents. Pitt and Soni

Using Video Interaction Guidance Directly with Children and Young People – A Case Study. Walker

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